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The Bootleg Files: Gentlemen Marry Brunettes

BOOTLEG FILES 858: “Gentlemen Marry Brunettes” (1955 musical starring Jane Russell and Jeanne Craig).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube and DailyMotion.com.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: None.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS:
Most likely because of music rights clearance problems.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely.

Despite its similar title, the vaguely identical plot involving two American showgirls in Paris and the presence of Jane Russell, the 1955 “Gentlemen Marry Brunettes” is not a sequel to the 1953 “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.” Yes, the source material – Anita Loos’ 1927 novel “But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes” – is a sequel to her 1925 “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” but the film does not use the plot of the Loos book.

Indeed, the two films should not be mentioned in the same breath. “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” is one of the greatest musical comedies of all time – a witty, stylish, rollicking classic that offered Russell and Marilyn Monroe their best screen roles. “Gentlemen Marry Brunettes” doesn’t come close to the first production’s greatness at any level.
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Oscars, Shmoscars: 10 Classic Films That Didn’t Receive An Academy Award Nomination

This coming Sunday, movie lovers will be watching the Academy Awards telecast and betting on which films and creative artists will take home the celebrated prize. Oddly, the history of the Oscars is heavy with classic works that failed to snag a single nomination – and the reasons for the omissions are among the great mysteries of movie history.
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Jane Russell: A Tribute

Jane Russell’s stardom was engineered by Howard Hughes’ fervid imagination, and her initial publicity overemphasized her remarkable physique. But she was a genuinely talented performer adept at light comedy and melodrama. In this episode of “The Online Movie Show,” actor/writer Joe Mannetti returns to offer a tribute to Jane Russell’s iconic place in Hollywood history.

The episode can be heard here.

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The Bootleg Files: The Apple-Knockers and the Coke

BOOTLEG FILES 663: “The Apple-Knockers and the Coke” (1948 stag film).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: Not believed to be included in any commercial release.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS: A naughty film that circulated underground for decades.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely at this time.

For a number of years, rumors circulated that Marilyn Monroe appeared in pornographic movies. Much of the fuel for that belief came from her 1949 nude calendar art photo shoot, for which she only received $50. After all, if the great MM could disrobe for a still photographer during the period when she was a struggling actress, why wouldn’t she go one step further and go clothing-free for an adult film?
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The Marx Brothers in Love Happy

The Marx Brothers’ final feature film was the 1949 comedy “Love Happy,” and the story behind the creation of this cinematic swan song was more astonishing than the on-screen antics. In this episode of “The Online Movie Show,” Kevin Scott Collier, author of “The Marx Brothers Love Happy Confidential,” details the film’s tumultuous production and release history, while providing insight in how Marilyn Monroe landed her scene-stealing role.

The episode can be heard here.

“The Online Movie Show” is produced at the Platinum Wolfe Studios.

Playboy: The Nude Marilyn [Magazine]

The most iconic and groundbreaking erotic magazine for men in the world, has sought out to celebrate another icon: The one and only Marilyn Monroe. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the starlet’s unfortunate death, Playboy Magazine has dug in to millions of their archival photos in their database and has shared with fans an exclusive spread of Monroe’s nude shots, some of which have never been seen before. One can only imagine what continues to keep the world enticed and allured by Marilyn Monroe, and why, in spite of her tragic life and terrible end, young female starlets and actresses alike continue to emulate and worship the woman. Monroe was clearly in a league of her own, a bombshell of a beauty who defined sexuality and approached all forms of sexual appeal without batting an eye. She was sensual but humble, daring but innocent, vivacious but modest, and gave a smile that many modern female stars simply can not duplicate. Mostly though, she was an angel without wings.

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